SGM Herb Maison

Phone: 719.382.1666

Email:

Degrees and Certifications:

MA, Secondary Education BA, Social Studies and History

SGM Herb Maison

SGM Maison served in the Army Engineer Corps as a Combat Engineer for 20 years from 1987 to 2007. He served in the 10th Mountain Division(Light); the 6th Infantry Division(Arctic Light); the FLW Drill Sergeant School(Libby NCO Academy); the 2d Engineer Brigade;  and the 91st Infantry Division.  after serving 20 years in the Army. taught JROTC for three years at Montbello High School in Denver. He retired from the military after serving 20 years as a combat engineer. 

Upon retiring, he started teaching in the Denver Public School District at Montbello High School and served there for 3 years. SGM Maison started teaching at FFCHS in July(2009) and remains in position as an Army Instructor in the JROTC program. He currently runs the CyberPatriot (Cyber-defense) Program, the Academic/Leadership Teams, the Drill Teams, and is the Military Property Custodian.

  • JROTC Program Information

    The U.S. Army Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) is a program offered to high schools that teaches students character education, student achievement, wellness, leadership, and diversity. It is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Army and the high schools to produce successful students and citizens, while fostering in each school a more constructive and disciplined learning environment. The outcomes of the JROTC program are:

    • Act with integrity and personal accountability as they lead others to succeed in a diverse and global workforce
    • Engage civic and social concerns in the community, government, and society
    • Graduate prepared to excel in post-secondary options and career pathways
    • Make decisions that promote positive social, emotional, and physical health
    • Value the role of the military and other service organizations

    With the school’s support, the JROTC program achieves these outcomes by using a world-class 21st Century, technology driven, student centered curriculum. The curriculum consists of education in citizenship, leadership, social and communication skills, physical fitness and wellness, geography, and civics.

    JROTC History

     

    The U.S. Army Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (JROTC) is one of the largest character development and citizenship programs for youth in the world. The National Defense Act of 1916 established organized JROTC programs at public and private educational institutions. In 1964, Congress expanded the program to all military services and changed from active duty to shared support from the services and schools. As congressionally mandated by Title 10 United States Code, Section 2031, each military service must have a JROTC program to “instill in students in United States secondary educational institutions the values of citizenship, service to the United States, and personal responsibility and a sense of accomplishment.” JROTC’s mission, “To Motivate Young People to be Better Citizens”, is the guide post for the program’s success.



    The U.S. Army’s JROTC program currently operates in more than 1,700 public and private high schools, military institutions, and correctional centers throughout the United States and overseas. Approximately 40% of JROTC programs are in inner city schools, serving a student population of 50% minorities. As JROTC students (Cadets) progress through the program, they experience opportunities to lead other Cadets. A major component of the JROTC leadership and citizenship program is female Cadets. Female Cadets make up 40% of the Cadet population. The JROTC faculty is led by nearly 4,000 instructors who are retired from active duty, reserve duty, or National Guard Army service. Instructors are trained and qualified in accordance with the National Defense Authorization Act 2007 to teach and mentor approximately 314,000 JROTC Cadets annually.

    Since 2005, the U.S. Army JROTC program has been accredited as a Special Purpose Program by the national accrediting agency known as AdvancED (www.advanc-ed.org). JROTC curriculum provides equitable and challenging academic content and authentic learning experiences for all Cadets. All lessons are designed using a four part model to motivate the Cadet, allow the Cadet to learn new information, practice competency, and apply the competency to a real-life situation. Moreover, the four part model requires Cadets to collaborate, reflect, develop critical thinking skills, and integrate content with other disciplines. JROTC curriculum includes lessons in leadership, health and wellness, physical fitness, first-aid, geography, American history and government, communications, and emotional intelligence.

    The curriculum is rigorous and relevant to 21st century education. In fact, many high schools grant core credits for some of the subjects taught in JROTC. Our curriculum meets the standards of Common Core State Standards and in many states it aligns with Career and Technical Education clusters. Cadets learn and apply the curriculum using technology in the classroom.

    Instructors use technology in the classroom as an instructional strategy to engage Cadets in their learning. Examples of instructors using technology can be observed at the schools when they use our learning management tool, the Curriculum Manager (CM) which houses the instructors’ lesson plans, classroom management strategies and techniques, references, and a myriad of other teacher help aids. Our partnership with Turning Technologies enables Cadets to engage in JROTC lessons using an interactive student response system (clickers) and a mobile interactive whiteboard (MOBI). Cadets use these technologies to complete summative and formative assessments, present presentations, and play educational games to promote learning. Outside the classroom, Cadets can extend their use of technology. When Instructors register their Cadets with the Conover Company using Conover Online, Cadets are able to assess their emotional intelligence and complete skill enhancement lessons using any mobile device. Cadets must participate in co-curricular activities to reinforce what is learned in the classroom.

    JROTC Co-Curricular Activities

    Cadets participate in a myriad of co-curricular activities to demonstrate their attainment of lesson outcomes. Some of these activities include precision and exhibition military drill competitions, air rifle competitions (optional), Raider Challenge competitions, JROTC Leadership and Academic Bowl (JLAB), Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Camp, and a physical fitness competition known as JROTC Cadet Leadership Challenge (JCLC). Cadets who complete 4 years of JROTC co-curricular activities and its challenging curriculum will be more college and/or career ready.

    College Opportunities

    With assistance from an organization working independently of JROTC, the College Options Foundation can help Cadets locate colleges offering credits for completing JROTC. Additionally, Army ROTC (not JROTC) offers college scholarships to Cadets who qualify for their scholarship program. For more information, visit www.collegeoptionsfoundation.net or www.goarmy.com/rotc/high-school-students.html.

    National Impact.

    Arguably, JROTC is one of the most successful and significantly impactful youth-oriented programs in American history. As educators and others measure success, we have identified five Quality Indicators used to measure the effectiveness of the program in high schools. These five Quality Indicators are attendance, graduation, indiscipline, drop-out rate, and GPA. JROTC exceeds schools’ averages in each of these categories:

    Quality Indicators

    CATAGORY SCHOOL JROTC
    Attendance 90.29% 93.54%
    Graduation 83% 93.98%
    Indiscipline 5.2% 1.7%
    Dropout 8% <1%
    GPA 2.72 2.91

    Continuous Improvement

    As an accredited Special Purpose Program, JROTC must adhere to AdvancED’s Standards of Quality. In 2015, JROTC implemented the JROTC Program Accreditation (JPA) evaluation program. The JPA provides a holistic review of Cadets’ and instructors’ performance with emphasis on documenting continuous improvement.

    The JROTC Curriculum

    Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) is the Department of Defense's (DOD) largest youth development program.

    JROTC serves as a character and leadership development program for our nation’s high school students. High school students enrolled in JROTC are called “Cadets.” There are approximately 314,000 Cadets enrolled in JROTC in over 1,700 high schools, led by 4,000 retired Army Instructors.

    Vision

    Providing a quality citizenship, character, and leadership development program, while fostering partnerships with communities and educational institutions.

    The JROTC Creed

    • I am an Army Junior ROTC Cadet.
    • I will always conduct myself to bring credit to my family, country, school and the Corps of Cadets.
    • I am loyal and patriotic.
    • I am the future of the United States of America.
    • I do not lie, cheat or steal and will always be accountable for my actions and deeds.
    • I will always practice good citizenship and patriotism.
    • I will work hard to improve my mind and strengthen my body.
    • I will seek the mantle of leadership and stand prepared to uphold the Constitution and the American way of life.
    • May God grant me the strength to always live by this creed.

    Our Mission:

    "To Motivate Young People to be Better Citizens"

    U.S. Codes and Regulations

    The U.S. Army Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (JROTC) Program is one of the largest youth leadership focused programs in the history of the United States. It is mandated by Congress, and more than 310,000 youth participate annually.

    There are several guidelines as listed here that assist the United States Army Cadet Command in administering the program. Title 10, U.S. Code, the DODI, AR 145-2, and other regulatory guidelines provide the program’s purpose, goals, criteria, and mandates as applicable to Cadets/students, instructors, units, and the inter-relationship of each. They outline the administration, curriculum, training, logistics, operations, and resources associated with the program, and establish a baseline of goals and objectives that support the mission, “To Motivate Young People to be Better Citizens”.